Tagged: software design Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Michael Krakovskiy 4:42 pm on July 26, 2008 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Albrecht Durer, Andy Hertzfeld, Arc, , , Florence, , Hacker ethic, Hackers & Painters, , internet startups, Jane Austen, , , Paul Graham, Rhode Island School of Design, software design, , web-based application, , Yahoo Store,   

    Hackers and Painters: Big Ideas from the Computer Age 

    “The computer world is like an intellectual Wild West, in which you can shoot anyone you wish with your ideas, if you’re willing to risk the consequences.” –from “Hackers & Painters: Big Ideas from the Computer Age,” by Paul Graham We are living in the computer age, in a world increasingly designed and engineered by computer programmers and software designers, by people who call themselves hackers. Who are these people, what motivates them, and why should you care? Consider these facts: Everything around us is turning into computers. Your typewriter is gone, replaced by a computer. Your phone has turned into a computer. So has your camera. Soon your TV will. Your car was not only designed on computers, but has more processing power in it than a room-sized mainframe did in 1970. Letters, encyclopedias, newspapers, and even your local store are being replaced by the Internet. “Hackers & Painters: Big Ideas from the Computer Age,” by Paul Graham, explains this world and the motivations of the people who occupy it. In clear, thoughtful prose that draws on illuminating historical examples, Graham takes readers on an unflinching exploration into what he calls “an intellectual Wild West.” The ideas discussed in this book will have a powerful and lasting impact on how we think, how we work, how we develop technology, and how we live. Topics include the importance of beauty in software design, how to make wealth, heresy and free speech, the programming language renaissance, the open-source movement, digital design, internet startups, and more. And here’s a taste of what you’ll find in “Hackers & Painters”: “In most fields the great work is done early on. The paintings made between 1430 and1500 are still unsurpassed. Shakespeare appeared just as professional theater was being born, and pushed the medium so far that every playwright since has had to live in his shadow. Albrecht Durer did the same thing with engraving, and Jane Austen with the novel. Over and over we see the same pattern. A new medium appears, and people are so excited about it that they explore most of its possibilities in the first couple generations. Hacking seems to be in this phase now. Painting was not, in Leonardo’s time, as cool as his work helped make it. How cool hacking turns out to be will depend on what we can do with this new medium.” Andy Hertzfeld, co-creator of the Macintosh computer, says about “Hackers & Painters”: “Paul Graham is a hacker, painter and a terrific writer. His lucid, humorous prose is brimming with contrarian insight and practical wisdom on writing great code at the intersection of art, science and commerce.” Paul Graham, designer of the new Arc language, was the creator of Yahoo Store, the first web-based application. In addition to his PhD in Computer Science from Harvard, Graham also studied painting at the Rhode Island School of Design and the Accademia di Belle Arti in Florence.

     
  • Michael Krakovskiy 9:43 am on August 17, 2005 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Fog Creek Copilot, , FogBugz, Glare, Joel, , premature baldness prevention product, project management, , software design   

    Party Pictures 

    I’ve attended the Joel‘s demo party for Fog Creek Copilot, an amazing grey hair and premature baldness prevention product. Here is my photo report.

    The Joel is famous for creating humane working conditions. Natural light, dual flatscreen monitors, Aeron chairs. Actually, this is very similar to the setup that I have at home, except I have a view of Brooklyn instead of Manhattan. My chair at work is a butt-hurting monster, but if I stand up in my cube and really crane my neck, I can see the same skyscrapers, but from the other side.

    Joel was literally mobbed by fans.

    I dragged him away and had a couple of minutes to take a picture of him.

    A funky light fixture was casting a glare on the famous office partition window, but I used it for a cheesy “idea” effect.

    Michael Pryor had way too much fun with a Zero Fog Blaster.


    Despite a wide array of snacks, he chewed on the poor defenseless office plant.


    Ad:
    Zero Fog Blaster shoots far traveling rings of non-toxic smoke. Provides hours of fun.

    Joel’s books mix Yiddish and other types of humor with software design and project management. Even more fun than Zero Fog Blaster.

    You should also own:
    User Interface Design for Programmers
    Painless Project Management with FogBugz

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel