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  • Michael Krakovskiy 5:27 am on September 11, 2006 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Alliance for Downtown New York, , , Jason McCabe Calacanis, Silicon Alley Reporter, Weblogs,   

    In Our Minds 

    Has it been 5 years? Don’t know. Sometimes it feels like it happened last year, sometimes – many years ago, and sometimes – like it never happened at all. My mind often fills the horrible void in the skyline with two ghostly towers and that brings me some comfort. I really can’t believe that the towers, and along with them somewhat simpler times are gone. To some images of the Twins might be unsettling, but I treasure them.

    A few days ago I was leafing through my old issues of Silicon Alley Reporter, Jason McCabe Calacanis’ failed dot com rah-rah magazine. Almost every single issue carried this ad by the Alliance for Downtown New York.

    The alliance changed it’s logo, like so many other companies.

    I think that a logo redesign is the same thing as being ashamed of the past. I salute every company that kept the original logo. It does not really matter what happened. The World Trade Center will keep standing, even if only in our minds.

    This, of course, is only my opinion. Let me know what you would have done by voting in my latest poll.

  • Michael Krakovskiy 1:34 am on September 16, 2003 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Agar, , cloning, , , , , MTA police, officer, Proxicom, Razorfish, , Sapient Corporation, , Silicon Alley Reporter, , ,   

    Looking At The Things Flashing By 

    Lj user saltdog reminded me of something from the not so long gone era of dotcoms. Back then there was a tremendous proliferation of web development companies that called themselves “agencies”. I worked for one back then.

    These companies behaved kind of like bacteria in a pool of agar-agar. At first they multiplied. Razorfish, iXL, Scient, Viant, Sapient, Agency.com, Organic, Xpedior, Proxicom. Then they tried to enlarge themselves. Some by what they called “organic growth” which is like when a bacteria that grows more cells. If I remember correctly Razorfish tried doing that. Others engorged themselves by swallowing smaller companies like some corporate amoeba. A prime example of that was iXL. Then there was a type of companies that multiplied by cloning. Scient, Viant and Sapient even had cloned names.

    Clients that wanted websites (agar-agar) were plentiful, but coding monkeys (minerals) were the growth limiting factor. The agencies spent much of their profits on advertising to lure in potential employees. One of the more creative ways I’ve seen at Sapient (I think, it could have been some other -nt clone). They rigged their website to detect referrals from ip addresses that belonged to other agencies and present a customized front page that presented top reasons to leave that agency and start working for the clone.

    A magazine ad (I think from Silicon Alley Reporter) that stuck in my head and what lj user “saltdog” reminded me of was rather unique. It was just a copy of a ticket. A real ticket given by an MTA cop to some codemonkey at some now defunct agency. It was a little hard to read and probably not very eye catching. In the memo field of the ticket it said something like this: ” MTA police officer [Cop’s name] encountered [Codemonkey’s name] riding between the cars of the [some letter or number] train. When asked about what he was doing [Codemonkey] answered, that he was “looking at the things flashing by” “. The ticket was for $25 or $50 dollars, or something like that. The copy below the ticket invited people who like “looking at the things flashing by” to go work for that agency.

    Yeah, that in itself was the epitome of the dot com era. Looking at the things flashing by. Then the amoebas, multicellular scum and clones ran out of agar-agar and began to merge, become swallowed by more evolved corporations and die.

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