Tagged: carbonation Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Michael Krakovskiy 4:37 pm on September 18, 2005 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: acceptable food, , carbonation, , Coca-Cola C2, , , , , kobe, Mexican Coke, myth-shrouded beverage, , , , , , , , , ,   

    The Taste of the Old New Coke 

    Let me start with one of my favorite quotes from The Matrix:

    Tank: Here you go, buddy; “Breakfast of Champions.”
    Mouse: If you close your eyes, it almost feels like you’re eating runny eggs.
    Apoc: Yeah, or a bowl of snot.
    Mouse: Do you know what it really reminds me of? Tasty Wheat. Did you ever eat Tasty Wheat?
    Switch: No, but technically, neither did you.
    Mouse: That’s exactly my point. Exactly. Because you have to wonder: how do the machines know what Tasty Wheat tasted like? Maybe they got it wrong. Maybe what I think Tasty Wheat tasted like actually tasted like oatmeal, or tuna fish. That makes you wonder about a lot of things. You take chicken, for example: maybe they couldn’t figure out what to make chicken taste like, which is why chicken tastes like everything.”

    There are certain things that you should really taste at least once, but are usually hard to get a hold of to taste, like let’s say top quality caviar, or kobe beef, Peter Luger’s steaks . Other things, like oysters, haggis, Gray Papaya and Nathans hot dogs, high quality sashimi and other notable foods, that might be hard to obtain everywhere, but are still more or less affordable. There are whole lists of “things to try at least once” out there.

    Then there’s a category of items that were eaten in the olden times, but are not considered acceptable food anymore: whale meat, horse meat and other intelligent and/or exotic animal meats. I’ve had whale steaks back in the day, whale meat was widely available in the Soviet Union, as well as horse sausage. Since I ate a lot of hot dogs , I am sure I had my share of cats, dogs and pigeons.

    And of course, there are commercial drinks with formulations that are not made anymore. The first Coca Cola (the one with cocaine), Starbucks Tazo Blended Drinks, Incredibly and Sharkleberry Fin Kool-aid (as well as many other discontinued flavors.)

    I was always especially interested in one soft drink that I never got a chance to taste: the “New Coke.” The myth-shrouded beverage seemed to be out of reach for me, until thanks to the twin wonders that are packrats and eBay, I got my own unopened can or genuine New Coke. That’s a reason for the new installment of Gastronomic Adventures, of course.

    I chilled the $10+shipping can of soda and photographed it in all its glory. Look, just look at it!

    I was expecting the can, that is at least 13 years old (in 1992 New Coke was renamed Coke II) to be completely devoid of carbonation. I was ready for a foul smell, discolored soda, etc. To my surprise, the carbonation was mostly normal and the coke smelled just fine.

    I kind of knew what to expect — in theory New Coke has the same formulation as Diet Coke, except with sugar instead of aspartame, and should taste similarly to Diet Coke With Splenda. I knew that New Coke was supposed to be sweeter than Coca Cola Classic.

    Of course, taste tests are a tricky thing. I am pretty sure I would have a lot of trouble telling Pepsi from Coke from Mexican Coke (the one in glass bottles and sweetened with cane sugar) from Diet Coke (if it’s with ice).

    In any case, decade old New Coke _did_ taste a bit like Diet Coke With Splenda. It was not as sweet as I expected, and had that weird little aftertaste that I always associated with the Splenda Coke. I think in Diet Coke it’s masked by the aspartame and in Classic by higher acidity.

    I seem to have not suffered any stomach upset or anything of that matter. Upsettingly I did not acquire any noticeable superpowers, except the ability to say that I’ve tasted the New Coke.

    P.S. Does anybody know how to obtain some surströmming online or in New York?

    P.P.S. I Know about hufu. I think it’s a hoax.

     
  • Michael Krakovskiy 3:41 am on April 27, 2005 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , beverage, , , carbonation, , , , , , , , , Japanese tea ceremony, , , , Thailand,   

    Caffeinated Bubble Trouble 

    It’s a proven fact : bubbles make caffeinated beverages better. Take a crappy tonic drink from Thailand, add carbonation, introduce it in Europe and the US and bam – you are a billionaire. Introduce espresso (simplistically speaking a very concentrated coffee with a foam of sugars, proteins and oils on top) and cappuccinos (add foamed milk to an espresso) in America on industrial basis – and bam – you almost a billionaire.

    Seems like the next logical step is tea. You see, Japanese have this tea ceremony thing. Never being a big fan of tea, but being a Japanophile at heart, I always wanted to try that. Unfortunately to this day I haven’t, but I definitely tried some tea that is used in the ceremony. They were selling it in a booth in Kyoto alongside with ice cream.

    Japanese tea ceremony involves two kinds of tea, “thick” and “thin”. From what I understand the difference mainly in the dilution and the quality of tea. I like stronger flavors, like espresso and scotch, so I prefer to make thick tea. Making is very simple. You take some high quality powdered tea called Matcha and put it into a bowl. You pour some hot water on top (I use the water from my espresso machine’s hot water spigot). Then you take a special whisk called chasen that is made by splitting a single piece of bamboo and whip your beverage up, kind of like making shaving lather with those old fashined shaving whisks.

    You get a radioactive green liquid that is absolutely loaded with green tea flavor, caffeine and and antioxidants. I already went through a package of medium cheaper Matcha, I think I’ll order some of the higher quality stuff as well.

    Here’s how Matcha is served in Japan, with regular tea and sweets. The one on the right is wrapped in a pickled leaf of sakura.

    Here’s what I just made for myself:

     
  • Michael Krakovskiy 9:24 am on December 5, 2004 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: carbonation,   

    White Paper, The Non-boring Kind 

    As a deeply materialistic person I have a lot of various collectible kipple in my cubicle and at home. I like to brag about artifacts that I own, but often don’t because I am often ashamed of photos of them that I take.

    Well, no more. I thought about it for a while and realized that the best way to photograph my knick-knacks would be in sort of white background product catalog way. B&H has many fine lighting kits with domes, lights, boxes and backgrounds. I guess I’ll go there some day to pick one up after conferring with surly yarmulke wearing salespeople.

    Meanwhile I headed over to my nearest drugstore and purchased a large sheet of white construction paper. I propped it up against some books on my table, placed the first object to be photographed on it and pointed my daylight reading lamp on it. The trick to avoid reflections is to shoot from some distance with a zoom lens.

    Behold: an 1989 vintage (you can kind of see the date on the label) bottle of imported Soviet Pepsi in all its glory! Still full, and even seems to have some carbonation remaining. I bet for many of you this will bring back some memories as it does for me.

    Also see my posts about Soviet soda and soda machines if you missed them.

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel