Tagged: Apple Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Michael Krakovskiy 8:14 pm on December 24, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Apple, , , , , , Markus Frind, , Nevada Test Site, okcupid.com, , , Web Heirarchy, web people, web traffic,   

    Are Tables Important? 

    I was talking to a former co-worker about Inc Magazine’s cover story about Markus Frind and his very profitable, but godawfully ugly dating website plentyoffish.com.

    My co-worker (a programmer) loaded up the website. He took a quick look around and opened the source of the ratings page. Giggling like Bevis he could not believe what he saw: a gradient bar that was coded as [gasp!] an HTML table with bgcolor attributes.

    It looked like this:

    And was coded like that:

    <table border=0 cellspacing=0 cellpadding=0 width=100%>
    <tr height=5><td bgcolor=#204080><img width=1 height=5 border=0>
    </td><td bgcolor=#202F70><img width=1 height=5 border=0></td>
    <td bgcolor=#3F2060><img width=1 height=5 border=0></td>
    <td bgcolor=#5F2050><img width=1 height=5 border=0></td>
    <td bgcolor=#7F1F4F><img width=1 height=5 border=0></td>
    <td bgcolor=#90103F><img width=1 height=5 border=0></td>
    <td bgcolor=#B0102F><img width=1 height=5 border=0></td>
    <td bgcolor=#CF0F1F><img width=1 height=5 border=0></td>
    <td bgcolor=#E0000F><img width=1 height=5 border=0></td>
    <td bgcolor=#F00000><img width=1 height=5 border=0></td>

    He was going on and on and on about how tables are bad, and mwu-ha-ha-ha — look at this.

    I was fully expecting him to take umbrage at the logo, the overall look and feel of the site, at the grotesquely skewed photo thumbnails. But no, all he was seeing is that Mr. Frind “used a table”.

    I tried to tell my co-worker that despite “tables” or ugliness this website generates tens of millions of dollars of profit to its creator, that it has as much web traffic as Yahoo while being served a small handful of very powerful servers, that it was created and maintained by a single person who gets to keep most of the profits – but to no awail. The kid could not get over “tables”.

    A famous hacker JWZ once was asked about his feelings about “an open source groupware system”. In a famous rant that followed he produced some of the best advice importance that I’ve ever seen:

    “So I said, narrow the focus. Your “use case” should be, there’s a 22 year old college student living in the dorms. How will this software get him laid?”

    While I’ve never heard of HTML tables (not the furniture kind) playing any role in getting laid, plentyoffish.com must have resulted in a mind boggling amount of action.

    Plentyoffish.com, being a technological and aestetical abomination that it is, is firmly rooted in the lower, fundamental layers of Maslow’s Hierarchy and my Web Heirarchy.

    At the most basic people need oxygen, water, food, to take a dump/whiz, sleep, sex, and a predictability in environment.

    On the web people need hypertext, images, search, speed, and community features. If you provide all of these for a topic that is important to people, you will be successful. Start thinking about “html tables vs divs” first, and likely you won’t get to the important stuff.

    Doing it another way – saying, look, I’ll do a site just like plentyoffish but prettier and without HTML tables does not work very well: Frind’s competiors at okcupid.com who set out to do just that are not succesful in toppling plentyoffish.

    Ugliness for the sake of ugliness is not a good thing. In the long run people want things to be pretty, like Apple products and not ugly like Microsoft products. But taste, being pretty high up in the pyramid of needs only becomes a factor after all the basic needs are met.

  • Michael Krakovskiy 4:51 pm on July 26, 2008 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Apple, , , , , , , , ,   

    Apple T-Shirts: A Yearbook of History at Apple Computer 

    “The journey begins.”… Steve Jobs used the Zen proverb, “the journey is the reward,” to motivate engineers creating the original Macintosh. Not long after, the phrase was modified for this shirt given to all new employees during orientation.

    Apple employees have long been expressing themselves with t-shirt art. For twenty years t-shirts have chronicled events and accomplishments within Apple Computer. Here to view for the first time is the unique talent and creativity of some of the world’s most ingenious employees. Their hard work is represented in over 1500 pictures of more than 1000 shirts that mark the public recognition of the milestones they have achieved.

  • Michael Krakovskiy 4:51 pm on July 26, 2008 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Apple, Apple I, Apple i Smartphone, , , , , , industry giant, iWoz, Personal computer, , ,   

    iWoz: Computer Geek to Cult Icon: How I Invented the Personal Computer, Co-Founded Apple, and Had Fun Doing It 

    The mastermind behind Apple sheds his low profile and steps forward to tell his story for the first time.

    Before cell phones that fit in the palm of your hand and slim laptops that fit snugly into briefcases, computers were like strange, alien vending machines. They had cryptic switches, punch cards and pages of encoded output. But in 1975, a young engineering wizard named Steve Wozniak had an idea: What if you combined computer circuitry with a regular typewriter keyboard and a video screen? The result was the first true personal computer, the Apple I, a widely affordable machine that anyone could understand and figure out how to use.

    Wozniak’s life—before and after Apple—is a “home-brew” mix of brilliant discovery and adventure, as an engineer, a concert promoter, a fifth-grade teacher, a philanthropist, and an irrepressible prankster. From the invention of the first personal computer to the rise of Apple as an industry giant, iWoz presents a no-holds-barred, rollicking, firsthand account of the humanist inventor who ignited the computer revolution. 16 pages of illustrations.

Compose new post
Next post/Next comment
Previous post/Previous comment
Show/Hide comments
Go to top
Go to login
Show/Hide help
shift + esc