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  • Michael Krakovskiy 5:16 pm on July 26, 2008 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , and lecturer, Cadaver, Eliot Goldfinger, Figure drawing, , Human figure, , magnetic resonance imaging, Muscle, scientific model-maker, Sculpture, Superficial anatomy,   

    Human Anatomy for Artists: The Elements of Form 

    The power of the image of the nude–the expressivity of the flesh–has inspired artists from the beginning. An understanding of human form is essential for artists to be able to express themselves with the figure. Anatomy makes the figure. Human Anatomy for Artists: The Elements of Form is the definitive analytical work on the anatomy of the human figure.
    No longer will working artists have to search high and low to find the information they need. In this, the most up-to-date and fully illustrated guide available, Eliot Goldfinger–sculptor, illustrator, scientific model-maker, and lecturer on anatomy–presents a single, all-inclusive reference to human form, capturing everything artists need in one convenient volume. Five years in the making, and featuring hundreds of photos and illustrations, this guide offers more views of each bone and muscle than any other book ever published: every structure that creates or influences surface form is individually illustrated in clear, carefully lit photographs and meticulous drawings. Informed by the detailed study of both live models and cadavers, it includes numerous unique presentations of surface structures–such as fat pads, veins, and genitalia–and of some muscles never before photographed. In addition, numerous cross sections, made with reference to CT scans, magnetic resonance imaging, and cut cadavers, trace the forms of all body regions and individual muscles. Information on each structure is placed on facing pages for ease of reference, and the attractive two-color format uses red ink to direct readers rapidly to important points and areas. Finally, an invaluable chapter on the artistic development of basic forms shows in a series of sculptures the evolution of the figure, head, and hands from basic axes and volumes to more complex organic shapes. This feature helps place the details of anatomy within the overall context of the figure.
    Certain to become the standard reference in the field, Human Anatomy for Artists will be indispensable to artists and art students, as well as art historians. It will also be a useful aid for physical and dance therapists, athletes and their trainers, bodybuilders, and anyone concerned with the external form of the human body. With the renewed interest in figurative art today, this will be an especially welcome volume.

     
  • Michael Krakovskiy 5:38 am on September 14, 2005 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Brownstone Sculpture There, , Mister Sinister, , Roaring Twenties, Sculpture, The Roaring Twenties,   

    The Devil In The Details: Brownstone Sculpture 

    There is a little brownstone at 113 E 60th St in New York is rather plain. But it has a rather weird sculpture up top.

    At closeup it looks rather sinister, doesn’t it? I could not find any information about the building online. I wonder if the little guy a result of Victorian love of morbid and exotic things, or it was added later, in the Roaring Twenties.


    Ad:

     
  • Michael Krakovskiy 11:32 am on November 23, 2004 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Alexandria, Ancient Egypt, Ancient Egyptian architecture, Cleopatra's Needle, , Egyptian gods, falcon head, favorite pharaoh, Heliopolis, Horus, , , , Maat, National Basketball Association, Obelisk, Percy Shelly's "Ozymandias, pharaoh, Ramses II, Sculpture, Sun temple, , ,   

    There’s No Cleopatra And There’s No Needle 

    Central Park contains an amazing artifact commonly referred to as “Cleopatra’s Needle”. It’s one of the many Egyptian obelisks scattered all around the world, and one of the two that used to stand in front of the Sun temple in Heliopolis. A second obelisk is located in London these days.

    In general, Egyptian obelisks were moved around the globe by different governments kind of like a college statues by drunken frat boys. The Romans moved the two Cleopatra’s Needles to Alexandria, and then as gifts from the Egyptians to the Great Britain and the US, the were moved by British and American engineers to their current locations. Overall the moves turned out to be amazing feats of engineering, especially with the British overcomplicated scheme of building a pontoon around the obelisk and towing it with another ship.

    You can find it right across from the Met, on the 5th Ave. side approximately between 81st and 82nd.

    The pillar does not give an impression of being an element of the Sun god’s temple. The 3500 year old monolith is gloomy, foreboding and downright Lovecraftian. The shadow play at sunset is especially spooky (that’s what I tried to capture in the above picture).

    Cleopatra has very little to do with either obelisks. They were built by king Tuthmosis III (well, the king probably had some help from his slaves). Later everybody’s favorite pharaoh, Ramses II, seeing how there was a lot of space left on the obelisks added some of his own “press releases” to it:

    The writing looks like a story of an alien abduction (with the flying saucers and wavy tractor beams), but as it turns out these are normal hieroglyphics. “Bird , Bird , Giant Eye … Cat Head , guy doing this” and so forth. I thought that there were thousands of glyphs, but it turns out that they are just an alphabet. So the flying saucers on the picture are “R” sounds, and the “tractor beam” is an “H”.

    I was surprised to see the pharaoh being referred to as “Lord of the Two Lands, User-maat-ra”. What was he a user of? Well, as it turns out all pharaohs have ridiculous system of 5 different names. I mean, come on, a Horus name and the Golden Horus Name!? (Horus happens to be the Sun god, the one with the falcon head ) User-maat-ra happens to be the throne name, the one that one that the Greeks transcribed as Ozymandias.

    So he’s the king from Percy Shelly’s “Ozymandias” sonnet. Yup, good ol’ Ramses was kind of like Donald Trump – liked to build things and put his names on things. Also, like a rockstar or an NBA superstar he had sex with hundreds of women, siring hundreds of children as Durex Ramses condoms were apparently not available back then. Last but not least he was apparently the “7 cows dream” and “let my people go” pharaoh of the Bible.

     
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