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  • Michael Krakovskiy 6:09 pm on January 29, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , e - floating, Hamon, hard steel, high carbon steel, Japanese sword, Japanese sword polishing, , lower carbon steel, Military history, , programming editor, Samurai, , , steel interlock, Sword, , web servers   

    Hamon or the Skin Deep Beauty of Code 

    The craft of programming is a little depressing: you spend days and nights pushing bits inside a computer, weaving a pattern that will ignite the right pixels on monitors or magnetize the right atoms on disk platters. But it is craft nevertheless, except one where beauty matters very little. Coders create the true ukio-e – floating world, but one that is as ugly as it is fleeting.

    I’ve read a good chunk of Beautiful Code: Leading Programmers Explain How They Think, but I’m still far from understanding what beauty is in code. Ugliness is self-explanatory: if you recoil in horror after reading a few files, it’s ugly. I recoil on the daily basis.

    I’m not talking about the success or usefullness of things that code creates. I am pretty sure that the code that runs plentyoffish.com is as ugly as the website itself, but it does not detract from its success and utility.

    I think the key to my preception of code beauty is related to “hamon”: a concept in Japanese swordmaking. If you’ll look at a Japanese sword, you’ll usually see a wavy pattern near the edge of the blade. Hamon literally means “blade pattern”. It is created when a swordsmith applies special mud to the edge of a in a wavy pattern of varying thickness and composition, and then heats the sword and plunges it into hot water. You can see the process in this video (it starts at about 1:30 mark).

    The primary purpose of this treatment is to create a blade that is very hard and can take a lot of stress, which is a contradiction, as hard steel is very brittle. The edge gets the thinnest coating, and after heating and cooling turns into martensite hard crystals of high carbon steel. The thicker coated back turns into pearlite, which is a softer, but very flexible lower carbon steel. The hamon pattern is formed where these two types of steel interlock. The wavy shape makes the sword able to absorb shock better.

    The absence of or inferior shape of hamon clearly indicates the inferiority of the sword. The aesthetics of it are just a coincidence, but it is also the resason why the craft of the samurai sword endures: collectors and museums purchase them as works of art. I’ve seen many swords in museums, and even though you can’t appreciate them as well as by holding them, the patterns in the hamon are hypnotic.

    Here’s a good video of what hamon looks like in different ligting conditions.

    There are many different styles of hamon, here are some examples from very excellent “The Craft of the Japanese Sword“:

    There are of course many swords out there with fake blade patterns made with acid etch, wire brushing or other abrasives. Fakes are neither beautiful nor strong and easily identifiable.

    When I look at a code listing I also see a wavy pattern. It’s nowhere near as connected to quality as the hamon, but it is still often an indicator of it. Indentation, spacing, length of keywords and function names, the amount of syntactic sugar, overall length of the listing: good code is sometimes beatiful to look at.

    Sublime Text 2, a new programming editor that I am using, has an interesting feature: an insert that shows the whole file in miniature. Here are side by side beginnings of commit.c from (top to bottom) cvs, svn and git. I don’t know if anything can be determined by looking at these pretty skyscrapers of code, but aestetically I like git better.

    This goes a level further – into software architecture. There’s this old chestnut of the maps of system calls in Apache and IIS web servers. You can easily tell which is the product of Redmond craftsmanship.

    I would like to add that wavy patterns are the last things that I look for in code and this whole article is just a fluffy philosophical musing. Yet, maybe there’s something there in those patterns.

     
  • Michael Krakovskiy 7:26 am on February 9, 2005 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , bookstore chain, Bushido, , champion wrestler, fencing, , food tastes, Geisha, Hai - Yes Beero, , , , Mario Bros., , Office worker, Ringo, Samurai, Seaweed, , ,   

    Domo Arigato Mr. Roboto 

    I am thinking about going to Japan for my next vacation. Time to tally my knowledge of Japanese. Let’s see…

    Nippon – Japan
    Sushi – Raw fish with rice
    Sashimi – Raw fish
    Sake – Alcoholic drink. Some call it Japanese vodka or rice wine, but what do they know. It’s technically a rice beer.
    Yakitori – Kebab
    Tempura – Stuff fried in batter
    Nori – Seaweed for sushi
    Wasabi – Pickled radish
    Agari – Green tea (in sushi restaurants)
    Miso – Soy paste soup
    Mochi – Ice-cream (or other stuff) in a dough shell
    Arigato – Thank you
    So Des – So it is
    Godzilla – Big radioactive lizard
    Sumo – Along with competitive eation, one of the few sports involving a lot of fat people
    Yokozuna – A champion wrestler. Tend to be overweight
    Sarariman – Office worker, formerely a Samurai. Probably.
    Samurai – A Shogun’s report
    Shogun – Samurai’s supervisor
    Bushido – Samurai’s Rules and Regulations Manual
    Geisha – A woman who entertains Yokozunas, Samurais and Shoguns. As well as Sararimen with a good sarary.
    Sensei – Teacher
    Kohai – What Wall Street types call a Rabbi. One who helps out somebody less experienced.
    Sempai – Someone who has a Kohai.
    Karate – Pronounced Kara-tey.
    Something-do – Way of something.
    Kendo – Way of the sword. Somehow really means fencing dressed skirts with bamboo sticks.
    Robot-san – Mechanical human being. Some take Samurai or Geisha form.
    Kinokuniya – Japanese bookstore chain
    Ringo – Apple
    Ringu – Ring
    Waifu – Wife
    Chambara – Japanese movies about Samurai
    Manga – What Americans call Anime
    Jedi – Another word for Chambara; also a person with high midiclorian count
    Terevision – A device for watching Chambara
    Harakiri – A suicide method very popular in Chambara
    Kamikaze – A suicide method not very popular in Chambara. Also a drink
    Kohee – 8 dollar coffee
    Yakuza – Legitimate businessmen with a lot of tattoos and missing pinkies.
    Meiwaku – Trouble, disturbance.
    Kawai – Cute
    Pokemon – A very kawai little critter
    Makdonurado – A fast food place where sometimes you get a toy Pokemon with you meal and your food tastes like it’s made out of Pokemons.
    Katana – A type of Samurai’s cutting sword. Also name of Larry Ellison’s giant boat.
    Katakana – One of sets of Japanese characters. Either the one used for foreign words, or the other one.
    Hiragana – Same as Katakana.
    Hai – Yes
    Beero – Beer.
    Ebisu – God of something good, maybe beer. Also a type of beer.
    Kappa – Demon of some kind, I think lives in water. Also a character in Mario Bros. games.
    Tanuki – A smart shape shifting demon with huge balls.
    Futon – Bed
    Tatami – Rug

    Uh… Yeah, I think I am done.

     
  • Michael Krakovskiy 5:33 am on June 24, 2004 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Japanese swords in fiction, , , , R┼Źnin, , Samurai, Scorpio,   

    The (Drive)way of a Samurai 

    Larry Ellison’s Japanese fetish is well known. He owned at different times yachts named “Ronin”, “Katana” and “The Rising Sun”. According to “The Difference Between God and Larry Ellison” Larry often flies to Japan for Sakura Matsuri. And now he is building himself a $60 million 3000 sq. foot replica of a 16th century Japanese warlord’s mansion.

    The house will be built using traditional materials and without nails (good idea earthquake-wise), but I doubt that any warlord had a house that big, especially with an amazing master bath that will include “.. boulder that will be part of the master bathroom shower. The 30-ton stone (yes, that’s 60,000 pounds) was recently moved into place with a rented high-rise crane that was brought to the site expressly to move the “shower rock.” ”

    A house like that needs a driveway to match. Larry wants it paved with natural hand cut stone. The stone is quarried in Japan and China (Larry chose China because the labor is cheaper there) and for some reason needs to be cut on site. This means that the architect needs to provide a template for each and every stone. It would take months to do this by hand, but luckily a CIS student helped him, making Larry’s driveway his CS270 Project. Random, but not too random, concave and convex, angles not too sharp, 5 to 9 sides to a stone – this is not as simple as it seems :

    By the way, is it just me or does Mr. Scorpio from “The Simpsons” look very much like the samurai in question?

     
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