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  • Michael Krakovskiy 5:16 pm on July 26, 2008 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Acclaimed photographer, , , Adobe Photoshop version history, Adobe Systems, , , Black and White, Digital Imaging, , Director of Engineering, , , image processing, internationally renowned photographer, , Marc Pawliger, Martin Evening, , , Professional Image Editor, , Raw image format, raw image processing controls, Scott Kelby, , the black and white conversion tools   

    Adobe Photoshop CS3 for Photographers: A Professional Image Editor’s Guide to the Creative use of Photoshop for the Macintosh 

    Master the power of Photoshop CS3 with
    an internationally renowned photographer by your side.

    Adobes Photoshop CS3 comes with powerful new features with huge payoffs. But it can be overwhelming to learn, even for professional photographers, graphic designers, keen amateurs, and others who already have an initial grasp of Photoshop. Acclaimed photographer Martin Evening, who wrote the best-selling previous books, ‘Adobe Photoshop for Photographers’, makes it easy with this new, thoroughly updated edition.

    * Illustrated throughout with before-and-after pictures more than 750 professional, color illustrations!
    * Practical techniques and real-life assignments
    * Step-by-step tutorials
    * Keyboard shortcut reference guide

    Includes FREE DVD with:
    * QuickTime movie tutorials for MAC and PC
    * Searchable tips on tools, palettes layer styles, and shortcuts
    * Includes images selected for you to experiment with to get you up to speed with everything in the book, including the new Photoshop CS3 features, fast!
    * Updated Camera Guide to help you decide which will best suit your needs, plus bonus Digital Capture chapter in printable PDF format

    Uncover quickly exactly what Adobes CS3 now offers photographers. New tutorials focus on the key features introduced in CS3. You lose no time in finding out how to put your ideas to work with:

    * Adobes Camera Raw 4 plug-in that can now also process TIFFs and JPEGs
    * New Align controls for combining HDR images; Photomerge; new Clone Stamp; Curves dialog that now incorporates Levels functionality; and improved controls for Brightness/Contrast to match raw image processing controls
    * The latest on Black and White adjustment, which provides all the black and white conversion tools you need for optimum monochrome conversions
    * A pros scoop on choosing from among dozens of Photoshops image adjustment methods to get the results you want
    * Tips on Bridge 2.0 and Lightroom when you should use each
    * Top tactics for successful composite images, insider guidance on editing shadows and highlight adjustments, and lessons on how to preview and re-edit filter effects as many times as you want without complex workarounds

    Get the preeminent advice from one photographer to another as Martin completely updates you on the core aspects of working with Photoshop, digital workflow, and improving accessibility. Real-life examples, diagrams, illustrations, and step-by-step explanations ensure that youre up to speed with the next generation of digital photography in no time!

    Foreword by Adobe Systems’ key Director of Engineering, Digital Imaging, Marc Pawliger

    * Over 750 professional, color images make this book stand above the rest
    * New DVD! Searchable info explains tools, palettes & layer styles, also includes invaluable QuickTime movie tutorials
    * Master the power of Photoshop CS3 under the instruction of an internationally recognised Photoshop expert & Adobe alpha tester

  • Michael Krakovskiy 1:02 am on May 29, 2008 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Adobe Systems, , , , enhanced using Adobe, , , , pretty incompetent painter, , single chair, , , , ,   

    Photoshop Disasters 

    Seetharaman Narayanan did more to alter reality than 99.99999999 percent of people in this world. It’s ridiculous how much the look of everything changed after Photoshop. All the ads, illustrations, all the graphics in the world look different than they did in the 70s and 80s.

    If you wish, Adobe website will give you a number of useful lessons on how to use Adobe trademarks, such as:

    “CORRECT: The image was enhanced using Adobe® Photoshop® software.
    INCORRECT: The image was photoshopped.”


    “CORRECT: The image was enhanced with Adobe® Photoshop® Elements software.
    INCORRECT: The image was photoshopped.
    INCORRECT: The image was Photoshopped.
    INCORRECT: The image was Adobe® Photoshopped. ”

    Meanwhile everything I see around me in printed form has been photoshopped to death. These days when a professional digital camera is cheaper than a copy of Adobe® Photoshop® software and the streets of major cities are full of starving young models, the photoshopers out there would rather spend hours doing unnatural things with expensive stock photos.

    I could understand this if the companies who would be doing this were short on money. But you know, when the same crappy stock photo is used in an ad for Vagisil and an O’Reilly book cover? That’s ridiculous.

    There’s this blog that I’ve been reading lately called “Office Snapshots”. Recently they showed pictures of the offices of Vertrue. The seem to have spent more on a single chair than on the design of their “about us” page. Take a look: the title of the graphic boldly states “WHO WE ARE”. Judging by the graphic the answer is: “We are some smiling office drones from a crummy stock photo.”

    Another fun blog that I’ve been reading is Photoshop Disasters. They mock crummy designers. After reading it I started paying a bit more attention to the small details of various ads. It’s crazy how many disturbing details there are. For instance, just now, I picked up a copy of some magazine that my wife was reading. Literally the first ad that I saw had a 6-fingered model:

    Alteration of reality in photographs is not a new phenomenon, of course. There’s a great book called “The Commissar Vanishes” about the way photographs were altered in the Soviet times, especially to disappear repressed individuals. Besides sequences of photos of Stalin together with “disappearing” commissars, there’s a portrait of Stalin done by a pretty incompetent painter. Stalin, upon seeing the picture, crossed out the ear and wrote the following:

    “This ear says that the artist is not well schooled in anatomy. J.Stalin.”

    “The ear screams and shouts against anatomy. J.S.”

    I don’t have a scan of that page, but believe you me, that ear was almost as disturbing much of the photoshopped models in today’s ads.

  • Michael Krakovskiy 9:31 pm on October 18, 2006 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , actual successful products, Adobe Systems, animation system, , , Bob Metcalfe, Charles Geschke, , , David Boggs, , , , , , , , input devices, Internet time, John Warnock, laser printer, , , PARC, PostScript, , RAND Corporation, , , , Theodor Holm Nelson, Turing Award laureates, , , William Shockley, WYSIWYG text editor, Xerox corporation   

    Where’s My Flying Car Part I : KABOOM! 

    “Celebrating Gertsen, we clearly see three generations,
    three classes acting in the Russian Revolution. First –
    noblemen and landowners, Decembrists and Herzen.
    Horribly distant from the people. But their work was not in wain.
    Decembrists woke Herzen. Herzen began revolutionary agitation.”
    V.I. Lenin

    Computers have existed like for 200,000 years in Internet time, yet the innovation in computer technology seems to be a little slow. Brick and mortar slow. Let me present to you an approximate timeline:

    In 1945 Dr. Vannevar Bush wrote an article As We May Think about a device called the Memex.

    In 1960 Theodor Holm Nelson, inspired by Bush, coined the term “hypertext” and started on Project Xanadu, a vaporware Superinternet.

    In 1968 Dr. Douglas Engelbart delivered the MOAD, demonstrating videoconferencing, email, hypertext, copy and paste, as well as some novel input devices including a mouse.

    Bush, Nelson and Engelbart show a progression from a dream into reality. Bush was a pure dreamer – he never intended to actually try and build the Memex. Nelson at least tried to build Xanadu, although he failed miserably. He could not even get to the demo stage. Engelbart actually built enough stuff to make very impressive demos, although never to build actual successful products except the mouse. These guys suffered from the RAND Corporation syndrome–the common joke went that RAND stood for Reasearch And No Development.

    The problem with these three was that they could not focus on individual problems. Luckily for us, next came Xerox PARC. Xerox corporation had money coming out of its wazoo, decided to invest in a world class R&D center. They used the same approach that Google is using today: spend the extra money on hiring the brightest technologists around and let them run free and wild.

    Bush, Nelson and Engelbart were a lot like a character named Manilov in Gogol’s Dead Souls. Manilov was an owner of a large rundown estate. He spent his days dreaming about improving it. Wouldn’t it be nice to build a bridge over the river and on it build little merchant booths so that the peasants could buy stuff there. Of course, none of his projects ever went anywhere, and if they did, they were quickly abandoned.

    PARC engineers were men of action. Each concentrated on a particular aspect, and they’ve built working models of many things that we enjoy today: personal computer with GUI interfaces, Ethernet, WYSIWYG text editor, laser printer, and even a computer animation system amongst other things. Sadly, Xerox was able to capitalize mostly on the laser printer, which actually probably paid for all of PARC’s expenses. PARC indirectly influenced Apple and Microsoft in the development of GUI OS. Also Charles Simonyi left PARC to develop Word and Excel for Microsoft, thus creating an enormous amount of wealth. Bob Metcalfe and David Boggs also left PARC, took Ethernet and turned it into 3COM. John Warnock and Charles Geschke left PARC, took PostScript and created a little company called Adobe Systems. Well, you get the picture.

    To give you another analogy, the technological revolution of the 60s, 70s and 80s was like a hydrogen bomb. A hydrogen bomb is made of three bombs: a conventional explosive that ignites a fission explosive that in turn ignites a fusion explosion. Semiconductor industry created by William Shockley and the Traitorous Eight was the fuel, Bush and Company–the conventional explosion, PARC–fission, what came after–fusion. KABOOM!

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