Tagged: Rockefeller Foundation Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Michael Krakovskiy 12:10 am on December 29, 2007 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Mirabilis, , , , Rockefeller Foundation, , World Trade Center 7   

    Happy New Year! 

    Man, this was a tough year. I haven’t blogged much and you haven’t commented much, so I guess we are even.

    A lot of things happened. The little tree that I grew out of a pine cone from Rockefeller Center tree that was featured in 2006 card is growing fast. So does Natalie E. I grew 30-40 pounds or so.  With a little help from the Joel I found a new job and left Rockefeller Center (you should really check out his job board). I am at World Trade Center 7 now. I am slowly but steadily switching to Linux. I am hoping that 2008 is going to be my annus mirabilis because this one was more anus than mirabilis.

    Happy New Year!

    You can see the old New Year’s cards are here.

     
  • Michael Krakovskiy 5:35 am on May 24, 2007 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: beautiful metal rondels, , , John D. Rockefeller, John D. Rockefeller Sr., , , Oscar Bach, , Radio City Music, , , , , Rockefeller Foundation, , Women in the United States Navy   

    Rockefeller Center Wardrobe Malfunction 

    It’s now my 7th year working in the Rockefeller Center. I’ve been walking in it, around it and under it almost daily. Little by little the place opens its little secrets to me – a hidden restaurant here, an eccentric pigeon enthusiast or a subterranean piece of art there.

    I used to walk around the place with my camera in hand, like a tourist. Now I am a bit more like the dozens of professional photographers that inhabit the place (Rock Center is home to many news agencies), as my camera is a little nicer. With the nicer gear I get to see smaller details.

    John D. Rockefeller Sr., a very strict Baptist, did not approve of drinking and dancing. His son, John D. Jr, was a little less strict — there was dancing at his wedding, despite his father’s wishes (although still no booze). A lot of people think that John D. Sr was the one who built the Rockefeller Center, but you just need to look around the place to realize that Senior probably did not even set foot in it: the architectural art features dozens of naked or half-naked men and women.

    For instance, Radio City Music hall features three beautiful metal rondels designed by Hildreth Meiere. These have more exposed nipples than a dosen Superbowls.

    The one depicting “Drama” hides, what I guess is a little joke by Oscar Bach, the metalsmith who executed Meiere’s design.

    The maiden on the right is sporting a piece of nipple jewelry in a form of an old fashioned slotted screw:

     
  • Michael Krakovskiy 7:40 am on May 23, 2005 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , Indian restaurant, , , , , , , , Rockefeller Foundation, , Top of the World   

    Time to Get on the Top of the Rock
    or
    Can You Smell What’s Cooking at the Top of the Rock? 

    There’s one thing that I hate about Chrysler Building. It does not have a public observation deck. I feel that any major skyscraper needs to have two things at the top: a restaurant and an observation deck.

    To the owners the public areas at the top are usually a pain in the ass and rarely pay for themselves. Having a lot of people from the street come up to the very top of the building, adding to the overall traffic is not fun for building management from the security standpoint. I remember reading about the co-op board of a posh building at 30 Central Park South trying to evict Nirvana, a top floor Indian restaurant with amazing views of Central Park. They complained about the traffic and the cooking smells.

    Because of this most buildings that used to have observation decks and restaurants closed them. Over a the Tishman Building Top of the Sixes turned into an exclusive cigar club. At the City Services Building the public observation deck, which was actually planned as the owner’s penthouse, was turned into a closed lounge for AIG brass. An at the Chrysler Building, the observation deck became Schrafft’s Restaurant, then it morphed into posh and private Cloud Club, and then closed altogether.

    When I was younger, I was not particularly attracted to the views from high vantage points. But for some reason at the turn of the Millennium found me deeply fascinated with skyscrapers and views from them. To this day I can’t forgive myself not visiting the observation deck at WTC. I probably did not have enough money to eat at the perished Windows on the World, but not visiting Top of the World still fills me with remorse.

    Because of this upsetting tendency of restriction and destruction public spaces high in the skies, I find this very joyous news: the rocket-like 30 Rockefeller Plaza will be opening an observation deck to the public. It’s going to be called “Top of the Rock.”

    Rockefeller Center has an interesting distinction of being one of the very few Rockefeller family projects that carry their name (the other big one being Rockefeller University). Most people also think that it’s built and named after John D. Senior, the Mr. Burns prototype and semi-crazy hander outer of nickels, when in fact, it was the mellow John D. Junior who built it.

    Since the Rockefeller name is not that popular, it’s common to see “Rockefeller Center” to be shortened to sexier “Rock Center”, as for example the menu of Yummy Sushi contains several sushi combos named Rock X, where X is a number of the combo.

    As much as I tried, I could not find out a more definite date than “sometime this fall”, but one of the free booklets that you can get in the lobby of the GE (former RCA) building has a little blurb and the logo. I like the logo. It’s all Art Deco-ey.

     
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