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  • Michael Krakovskiy 5:10 pm on July 26, 2008 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Akron Art Museum, American art, Art Forum, Art Gallery of University of California at Irvine, Artforum, Arthur Fellig, , , , Daily News, director, director of the Art Gallery, , first news photographer, John Coplans, Manhattan’s police, , , , , Poland, senior curator, the Daily Mirror, the Daily News, , , , Weegee   

    Weegee’s New York: Photographs, 1935-1960 

    Weegee’s New York: Photographs 1935–1960

    Weegee’s legendary camera recorded an unmatched pictorial chronicle of a legendary time. Weegee’s New York is the New York of the thirties and forties, a city marked by the Great Depression, by unemployment and poverty, by mob violence and prostitution. He was the first news photographer allowed a police radio in his car. Racing through Manhattan’s streets after midnight, he often beat the cops to the scene of the crime to shoot the pictures which would scream from the pages of the Daily News and the Daily Mirror next morning. They still jump from the page with a restless immediacy and intense nervousness that has never been surpassed. The 335 photographs collected in this new softcover reprint tell the astonishing story of New York during one of its most violent and exciting periods. The introductory essay is by the former editor of Art Forum, John Coplans.

    Essay by Weegee

    Weegee (1899-1968),was born Arthur Fellig in what is now a part of Poland and arrived in New York at the age of ten. During his ten years at Manhattan’s police headquarters he published 5,000 photos that made him the most famous of a new breed of hardboiled news photographers. His book Naked City (later made into a film) was published in 1945, followed in 1953 by Naked Hollywood.

    John Coplans, born in 1920 in England, immigrated to the US in 1960. In 1962 he founded the periodical Artforum serving as its editor until 1980. He was director of the Art Gallery of University of California at Irvine; senior curator at the Pasadena Art Museum; and director of the Akron Art Museum, Ohio. At age sixty he took up photography full-time.

    335 duotone plates.

     
  • Michael Krakovskiy 5:06 pm on July 26, 2008 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Cuisine, director, Donburi, Editor-in-Chief, , , Foreword, , obscure ethnic food, Oyakodon, , Tsuji Culinary Institute, Yoshiki Tsuji   

    Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art 

    When it was first published, Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art changed the way the culinary world viewed Japanese cooking, moving it from obscure ethnic food to haute cuisine.

    Twenty-five years later, much has changed. Japanese food is a favorite of diners around the world. Not only is sushi as much a part of the Western culinary scene as burgers, bagels, and burritos, but some Japanese chefs have become household names. Japanese flavors, ingredients, and textures have been fused into dishes from a wide variety of other cuisines. What hasn’t changed over the years, however, are the foundations of Japanese cooking. When he originally wrote Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art, Shizuo Tsuji, a scholar who trained under famous European chefs, was so careful and precise in his descriptions of the cuisine and its vital philosophies, and so thoughtful in his choice of dishes and recipes, that his words–and the dishes they help produce–are as fresh today as when they were first written.
    The 25th Anniversary edition celebrates Tsuji’s classic work. Building on M.F.K.Fisher’s eloquent introduction, the volume now includes a thought-provoking new Foreword by Gourmet Editor-in-Chief Ruth Reichl and a new preface by the author’s son and Tsuji Culinary Institute Director Yoshiki Tsuji. Beautifully illustrated with eight pages of new color photos and over 500 drawings, and containing 230 traditional recipes as well as detailed explanations of ingredients, kitchen utensils, techniques and cultural aspects of Japanese cuisine, this edition continues the Tsuji legacy of bringing the Japanese kitchen within the reach of Western cooks.

     
  • Michael Krakovskiy 1:44 pm on July 26, 2008 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Ariel McNichol, , Community, David Kopp, director, , , , Free improvisation, Inside Facebook, mEgo, Mohammad Naqvi, , , Sr., , , ,   

    Inside Facebook: Life, Work and Visions of Greatness 

    As an early engineer, I was on the inside during Facebook’s explosive growth. In Inside Facebook, I’ll give you the scoop on the company as it became the premiere online environment for U.S. college students, including how and by whom the products were made, how you can use them best, views on what makes social networks so valuable, and where the industry is headed. You, too, can achieve startup success and attain your greatest dream; I hope to inspire you toward fulfilling your potential.

    “Love the book. It captures the ethos of the place and a substantial degree of the vision and drive which is a secret to success.”
    -David Kopp, Sr. Director, Community at Yahoo!

    “Inside Facebook is a compelling look inside at a fascinating moment. It’s a riveting read. Karel may be an Engineer, but after reading Inside Facebook you’ll see he’s a great storyteller. I couldn’t get myself to stop reading and wanting more.”
    -Ariel McNichol, CEO of mEgo.

    “I love the style. It’s made for college students, like Facebook. Karel takes you into the personalities and minds behind Facebook. A must read for young entrepreneurs, and anyone into online social networking.”
    -Mohammad Naqvi, UCR, creator of Facebook Notifier at fbQuick.com

     
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