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  • Michael Krakovskiy 3:22 am on October 17, 2008 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Cassandra, Computer, , dominant player, Dot matrix printer, , , , , , , , Trojans, X   

    Being Dead Wrong 

    I like to think that I have a great intuition and am very good at predicting things. I also sometimes feel that I suffer from the Cassandra syndrome, as people don’t listen to my prediction as much as I would like them to.

    This made me think about the times when I made ridiculously bad predictions. Here’s a list of what comes to mind off the bat:

    1. When I was young I thought that programmers will soon write a computer program for writing computer programs, and that computer programming as a profession does not have much of a future.

    2. I thought that architectural drawings will always have to be done by hand, as you can’t print out plans on dot matrix printers (the only printers I’ve seen at the time). I thought, sure, you can program some straight lines and such, but you’ll never get beautiful detailed drawings with all kinds of details.

    3. I thought that Handspring would become the dominant player on the handheld market the same way that IBM did: by opening up the peripheral standards.

    4. I thought that Diamond Rio would be huuuge and that Diamond Multimedia would become the hottest company ever because they were first on the market with an mp3 player.

    5. I thought that Apple would just shrivel up and die, and if not, that I would certainly never completely switch to Macs.

    Whewww, man. Those are some doozies. How about you, my readers?

     
  • Michael Krakovskiy 4:50 am on December 22, 2002 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Computer, Computer case, , , crappy hardware, , , dual processor, , file server, , flashable hardware, , IDE raid controller, , Jumper, , , nice cheap and super steady single processor, , , , PS2, Red Navy, , , , ,   

    WML: Dude, I Am Getting a Dell 

    Guess what? This post is going to be about microcomputers. PCs.

    I never owned a computer in the Soviet times. Not even a programmable calculator. I did have access to some old Wang clones called Iskra (Spark) in an after school program, played with a programmable calculator of a neighbour, played games on a frien’d PC, played games at my father’s friend’ work computer ( also PC), paid to play games on Sinclare computers that some enterprising people set up as a pay-per-play arcade, etc. Oh, I still remember the horror in the eyes of my teacher when I found a set of programs that calculated the level of contamination from a nuclear blast given the input of wind speed, bomb yeild and some other variables. Those Iskras were donated from the Red Navy.

    In the US, my father purchased a 386 for a humongous sum of $1300. It was put together in some computer shop on avenue U. That was in 1993 or 1992, I think. Since then, I’ve been upgrading my computer on the average once every three years. I think In all, I went through 3 cases, 6 motherboards and 2 monitors (not counting my wife’s computer). I never owned a brand name computer. After the second computer I’ve learned that I could be putting together myself.

    It seemed like a good idea at the time, putting together my own stuff. What could be simpler? Pop in a motherboard, a videocard, a modem, some ram, some hard drives — and you’ve got a box!

    I’ve become thoroughly familiar with what cuts from a ragged computer case feel like. I’ve learned how hard it is to be without the Internet when your computer is in pieces on the ground (and a driver needed to make the new hardware run is on the Internet, of course). There are very few types of flashable hardware that I did not have to flash. I accumilated a huge collection of computer screws, cables, cards and thermal processor grease.

    The questions that went through my mind were:
    Why are jumpers so tiny? (these days they have jumpers with little tails that can be taken out with just fingers)

    Why ide cables are so hard to deal with? (there are rounded cables available now)

    Why it’s so hard to find 0th pin on the hard drive connector? (newer ide cables come with a little peg that doesn’t allow it to be put in the wrong way)

    Which idiot came up with PS2 plugs? (one word – USB , well, ok, three words).

    And most importantly: WHY ALMOST NO PIECE OF HARDWARE, PORT OR CABLE COME WITH A LABEL THAT WOULD CARRY MANUFACTURER’S NAME AND A MODEL NUMBER????????????????????

    This is all slowly changing, of course, but the much bigger problem of minor factory defects and incompatibilities between chipsets still plague individually bought components.

    My last self-put together box – a dual processor PIII 1000 sucks ass. I could not get a single AGP video card to work with it. An IDE raid controller that worked ok on my previous motherboard wold cause all OS to crash. And finally, two little pegs that held the cooler on the processor broke, and I can’t keep PIIIs from overheating.

    I’d like to say, that after I’ve removed the raid card and put in a PCI video card, the system ran extremely steady for a year. Now it’s time to think about the future of my computers.

    So my resolution is this:

    1) Throw out the crappy dual processor motherboard and the crappy coolers. Buy a nice cheap and super steady single processor PIII motherboard + a stock Intel coolers and turn that computer into a file server. Four 120 Gig 5400 RPM drives (I don’t need the speed, and those drives run much cooler) should do the trick. The case of that computer is very nice and cool looking (it’s a square. It looks like this:

    Maybe I’ll even make the drives removable, but so far all removable racks that I’ve tried sucked ass.

    2) Buy a nice Dell workstation. That will be used for image manipulation and coding.

    3) Buy a big ass LCD monitor (or maybe one of those Sony 27″ CRT monitors) for use with the workstation.

    4) Buy a tablet pc for myself and a laptop for my wife.

    5) Donate or sell on eBay all the crappy hardware still sitting in my drawers.

    I think all the money I saved this year on rent should easily buy me this hardware.

     
  • Michael Krakovskiy 1:45 am on June 30, 2002 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Brainfuck, , Computer, , , Esoteric programming languages, Non-English-based programming languages, , Turing completeness   

    Esoteric Topics In Computer Programming 

    “Masochistic Programming”, “Non-Electronic Computers”, “Metalanguages” and “Self-Modification” are just some of the topics.

    You can learn about *W Programming Language, which has no other purpose, but to annoy the user;
    SMETANA language that can only modify itself, but is probably not Turing-Complete; and a tiny programming language called Brainfuck .

    I blame those pesky Canadians.

    Hey, alexei_, doesn’t it piss you off that self-modification is considered esoteric?

     
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